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October 22nd 2012
archived under: Cook Books, Grain Free, Meatless, Media Reviews, MmmMonday, Other, Recipes, Reviews
It's MmmMonday again, and that means I'm back to review another food-related book from my shelf!
This time, it's Sarah Fragoso's Paleo Pals: Jimmy and the Carrot Rocket Ship.

 

This is a kids' book, written in halfway-to-comic-book style, about a kid named Jimmy who doesn't want to eat the new weird Paleo foods (like meat and veggies) his parents have started to cook.

3 superheros (the Paleo Pals) come to his house and intervene by showing him what their favorite things about eating a Paleo diet are. After that, Jimmy is sold on Paleo, and helps to cook a Paleo meal with food he picked up at the market with the Pals.

His parents don't really believe any of what he said happened, but they're happy to see the change in Jimmy's attitude.

First of all… let me say I'm NOT the target audience for this book. This book is for families with slightly older kids (I'd say maybe 4 or 5 to around 9 or 10) who are making a change from the standard American diet to paleo.

Anneliese liked the pictures in this book, but whenever I started to read it to her, she would lose interest and wander away. The story is a bit slow for a 2 year old to follow. I finally just finished it on my own after she was asleep one night. It's not the most engaging story ever, but maybe an older child who was feeling like Jimmy does at the beginning of the story would think it was more exciting.

There aren't a lot of solid facts/information in it… that's not the point of this book. So if you're looking for a book that goes beyond “this is awesome food and it'll make you feel good when you eat it” you might need something else.

But like I said, maybe some 7 year old boy who is feeling discouraged (and maybe who likes superheros and comics) would really identify with it.

At the end of the book, there are a few paleo recipes aimed toward children, with catchy names, and Sarah notes where kids can help with the food preparation for each recipe. A great idea to get children in the kitchen with mom and dad, and involved in their food on another level!

I haven't had a chance to get to the grocery store for anything more complicated, so the apple slice sandwiches in the book looked good to me. I already had everything. (Well, the book says to put turkey on one, and I have roast beef, so… but you know, this one's not really a recipe. It's more of an idea.)

So the book has 2 different versions of the apple sandwich. One just has turkey, and the other has almond butter and raisins. I made three for Anneliese's lunch:

  1. Roast beef
  2. Almond butter and raisins
  3. Cream cheese and sunflower seeds

These would probably be great for a kid who was used to eating sandwiches or other sandwich-like “stacked” foods. Anneliese wasn't sure what to do with these piles of apples and fillings, so she took them apart and mostly just ate the insides. Oh well. I thought they looked good…

The bottom line is:

This book has the potential to be JUST WHAT YOU NEED, if you have an elementary-aged child and your family is transitioning from a standard American diet to Paleo, especially if your child is having a hard time with the change.

This book really isn't for my family though. My kids are too young, and paleo (or primal / lacto-paleo) is totally normal for them.

Still, the recipes look good and I'll be trying some others. (There's a kebab recipe that looks great, but I didn't have all of the ingredients on hand.) And maybe I will help Anneliese figure out what to do with sandwiches.

 







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